M.S. Degree in Teaching Students with Disabilities, Generalist, Grades 7-12

Designed for individuals interested in teaching adolescents with diverse abilities and unique needs across subject areas, the Master of Science in Teaching Students with Disabilities, Generalist, Grades 7-12 program combines rigorous course work with clinical experiences to prepare candidates for initial or professional certification in New York State. The course of study offers candidates the opportunity to examine and apply educational theory and evidence-based practices to gain the skills and competencies to effectively promote the learning, development, and academic achievement of all students with learning challenges in a variety of school settings.

The Teaching Students with Disabilities, Generalist, Grades 7-12 Program requires 42 credit hours. Coursework includes 15 credit hours of general pedagogical core courses and 27 credit hours of specific pedagogical courses, including six credit hours of field work related directly to teaching students in grades 7-12. A culminating E-portfolio, presenting course-based learning artifacts to demonstrate satisfactory development as an effective novice teacher, is required for graduation.

Teaching Students with Disabilities, Generalist, Grades 7 – 12 (42 CREDITS)

EDPN 620 Child Development and Learning in Cultural Context

This course focuses on the nature of physi­cal, cognitive, emotional, social, and moral development from birth through adoles­cence with implications for learning and teaching; major orientations in the study of child development, including Vygotsky and the neo-Vygotskian theories of child devel­opment and learning; periods of child de­velopment from birth through adolescence seen in a socio-cultural context, with impli­cations for learning and teaching; integra­tion of theory and research findings from the fields of developmental and educational psychology; and exploration of multicul­tural contexts for growth, development, and learning with diverse student populations. Students are also exposed to evidence-based methods of instruction and critically exam­ine the idea that instruction should be evi­dence-based.

SEDN 602 Introduction to Teaching Students with Disabilities

This course focuses on the historical background of current approaches to teaching children with disabilities; special education and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act; state and federal special education laws and regulations; identification for evaluation of students who may have disabilities; current theories and methodologies for working with students with disabilities; inclusion and the concept of the least restrictive environment; early intervention; special education curriculum modifications, classroom management, and use of technology; planning and designing co-teaching and collaborative work with other teachers; developing partnerships, including with the family, for the benefit of students with disabilities; transitional services and employment; educational challenges and instructional approaches for children with cognitive deficits, physical and sensory impairments, language delays, emotional disturbance, and learning disabilities; working with children with autism; application of principles of response to intervention and differentiated instruction; approaches and debates on reading and language arts instruction for native English speakers and English language learners.  Students are exposed to evidence-based instructional methods and critically examine the concept that instruction should be evidence-based.

SEDN 666 Language and Literature for Students with Disabilities, Grades 7-12

This course focuses on current approaches to assessing and promoting reading comprehension and critical reading and writing skills of grade 7-12 students with disabilities. Course topics include enhancement of oral and written communication skills; acquisition of literacy strategies that make text materials comprehensible and promote reading comprehension; tapping into motivational factors in literacy development during the grade 7-12 school years; acquisition of strategies for lifelong learning, and approaches to work with English language learners with disabilities. (Please note: This course is a prerequisite for SEDN 673.)

EDSN 640 Assessment of Individual Differences in General and Special Education: A Socio-Cultural Perspective

This course focuses on assessment in general education and special education of individual differences in intelligence, learning potential, personality, motivation, and student achievement; management of data from assessment and monitoring of student progress; characteristics of standardized tests; the role of educational testing in program design and informing instruction, particularly for students with disabilities, including children with autism; assessment of young children; use of achievement tests; introduction to dynamic (or interactive) assessment; differences between static and dynamic assessment; the use of teacher-made, informal tests; and opportunity to observe and practice use of achievement tests and/or curriculum-based assessment approaches in the classroom.

SEDN 601 Principles of Mathematics Instruction for Students with Disabilities, Grades 7-12

This course focuses on principles and practices for teaching mathematics to grade 7-12 students with disabilities. Course topics include number and quantity; algebra; functions; geometry, mathematical modeling; statistics and probability; trigonometry; common core state standards and CEC standards; instructional approaches in developmental context; planning and designing co-teaching and collaborative work with other teachers; identification and remediation of major obstacles to student learning in mathematics during the adolescent years; and application of mathematical and scientific concepts and skills to real-life settings. 

EDSN 650 Educational Technology in General and Special Education

This course focuses on the use of computers and other technological devices that facilitate communication, learning, and related functions in both general and special education contexts;   use of technology  to foster literacy, remediate reading problems, and promote  access to curriculum for all students;  special applications with computers in the classroom; information literacy; and recent developments in the field of assistive technology for students with disabilities, including students with autism. 

* For Touro College undergraduate education majors who took this course and received a grade of "B" or better, the credits earned will also count as graduate course credit toward the MS degree. However, in the event an undergraduate student does poorly in a graduate-level course and must take it again in their graduate program, financial aid will not be available for such coursework and both grades will appear on the student’s transcript. There are other collateral consequences to such coursework; please consult your advisor or Program Director for more details.

SEDN 617 Principles of Teaching Historical and Cultural Studies for Students with Disabilities, Grades 7-12

This course focuses on social, cultural, and developmental contexts for teaching historical and cultural studies to a diverse population of students with disabilities at the grade 7-12 level. Course topics include curriculum development, methods, and materials; language and literature in cultural context; overview of history and geography of United States and New York State in addition to essentials of world history; planning and designing co-teaching and collaborative work with other teachers; overview and, understanding of the geography of the interdependent world in which we live – locally, nationally, and globally; how the United States and other societies develop economic systems and associated institutions to allocate scarce resources; how major decision-making units function in the United States and other national economies and how an economy solves the scarcity problems through market and non market mechanisms; the governmental system of the United States and other nations; the United States Constitution and basic civic values of American constitutional democracy; ideas and ideals of citizenship; and interrelationships among historical, social, economic, political, and cultural forces effecting societies and the world.

SEDN 675 Field Experience in Special Education, Grades 7-12

Students complete 50 hours of field experience in work with students with disabilities at the grade 7-9 level and 50 hours of field experience with students with disabilities at the grade 10-12 level. Certified teachers who are enrolled in this course are required to complete 50 hours of field experience in total, 25 hours at the grade 7-9 level and 25 hours at the grade 10-12 level. (Inclusion classes with strong special education components are acceptable.) All field experience is done in accredited schools with the involvement of appropriately certified supervising or cooperating teachers who submit student evaluation forms at the conclusion of the semester. Over the course of the field experience and practicum courses, some work is done in a high-need school or a school serving a high-need community. Students keep time sheets of their hours, logs in which critical incidents are recorded and analyzed, respond to questions about grade 7-12 special education, and complete two term papers. The course includes scheduled group meetings. An assigned Touro College faculty member meets with students at their field experience sites and evaluates student work for the course. (Please note: This course must be taken within the first 18 credits of graduate studies.)

Download Guidebook

SEDN 606 Principles of Science and Technology Instruction for Students with Disabilities, Grades 7-12

This course focuses on principles and guidelines for teaching science and technology to grade 7-12 students with disabilities. Course topics include elementary principles of physics, chemistry, earth science, and the biological life sciences; application of mathematical concepts and skills in the study of science; application of scientific concepts to real-life settings; identification and remediation of major obstacles to student learning and achievement in the sciences; critical approaches to the benefits and hazards of technology, and planning and designing co-teaching and collaborative work with other teachers.

SEDN 618 Principles of Teaching the Arts and Physical Education for Students with Disabilities, Grades 7-12

This course focuses on the performing arts, health, physical education and family and consumer sciences for students with disabilities in grades 7-12. Course topics include cooperation in group sport and arts activities; the relationship of physical education and health education to other curricula areas; approaches to acquire  the necessary knowledge and skills to establish and maintain physical fitness, participate in physical activity and maintain personal health for students with disabilities; approaches to acquire the knowledge and ability necessary to create and maintain a safe and healthy environment and to understand and be able to manage personal and community resources for students with disabilities; planning and designing co-teaching and collaborative work with other teachers; approaches to adaptive physical education for students with disabilities; self-expression, self-regulation, and self-exploration through the arts; the relationship of the arts, movement, physical education, and health education to other curricula areas, including literacy; and special approaches to doing art work with students with disabilities. 

SEDN 673 Assessment, Diagnosis, and Remediation of Reading Disabilities, Grades 7-12

This course focuses on developmental and cultural contexts for understanding and remediating symptoms and causes of reading disabilities of grade 7-12 students with disabilities. Course topics include diagnostic instruments and approaches to assessment of reading disabilities of adolescents; programs, materials, and methods for encouraging engagement with literature, including through writing, and for instruction of grade 7-12 students with reading disabilities; use of high interest reading material appropriate for adolescents with reading disabilities; and one-on-one work with a grade 7-12 student with reading disabilities, including completion of a comprehensive case study, which must be retained by students for submission with their culminating project materials. (Please note: SEDN 666 is a prerequisite for this course.)

EDSN 600 History and Philosophy of Education and Special Education

Explores the historical and philosophical underpinnings of modern educational theory and practice, dating back to ancient Greek, Jewish, Christian, and Muslim writings on education and tracking developments into the present. It specifically examines the forces that have shaped educational policies in the United States, highlighting the current debate around meeting the educational and social-emotional needs of students from diverse communities. The role of technology in education and society at large, critical thinking skills, information literacy, and research-based instruction are also featured.

SEDN 672 Curriculum Development and Classroom Management for Students with Disabilities, Grades 7-12

This course focuses on general guiding concepts and skills in the teaching of reading, math, language arts, social studies, and science, with modifications of instructional methods and materials for grade 7-12 students with disabilities. Course topics include identification and referral for evaluation of students who may have disabilities, as well as state and federal special education laws and regulations; creation of a physical and social school environment that fosters literacy development, maximizes learning productivity, and prevents unnecessary behavior problems; approaches to classroom management; special attention to grade 7-12 students with autism; developmental and cultural contexts in approaches to understanding and intervening with children with emotional and behavioral problems in the secondary school years; planning and designing co-teaching and collaborative work with other teachers; developments of partnerships, including with the family, for the benefit of students with disabilities, and attention to the importance of self-awareness and critical self-reflection in teachers of secondary school students with disabilities. 

SEDN 678 Practicum in Special Education, Grades 7-12

Students complete one 20-day practicum experience or its equivalent (at least 100 hours) teaching students with disabilities (inclusion classes with strong special education components are acceptable) at the grade 7-9 level and one 20-day experience or its equivalent (at least 100 hours) teaching students with disabilities (inclusion classes with strong special education components are acceptable) at the grade 10-12 level. Certified teachers who are enrolled in this course are required to complete 20 days or 100 hours of practicum in total, 10 days (or 50 hours) at the grade 7-9 level and 10 days (or 50 hours) at the grade 10-12 level. All practicum work is done in accredited schools with the involvement of appropriately certified supervising or cooperating teachers who submit student evaluation forms at the conclusion of the semester. Over the course of the field experience and practicum courses, some work is done in a high-need school or a school serving a high-need community. Students keep time sheets of their hours, analyze lessons, write an essay on evidence-based methods of instruction, respond to questions about grade 7-12 education, and complete a comprehensive culminating project in which they analyze and discuss the ways in which various aspects of the program have affected their understanding of and interventions with their own students. Students also write a reflection paper on what they learned from carrying out the work of the case study. The course includes scheduled group meetings. An assigned Touro College faculty member observes practicum students for a minimum of two formal lessons in the classroom or other educational facility. (Please note: This course must be taken in the last semester of studies.)

Download Guidebook

Non-Credit Tuition-Free Seminars and Workshops

EDDN 511 Seminar in Child Abuse Identification and Reporting

Seminar on the identification and reporting of child abuse and neglect; signs and symptoms to look for; ways to approach children; understanding the variety of ways children may convey that they are being abused or neglected; teacher concerns regarding reporting abuse or neglect; rationalizations for not reporting; working with systems; and the aftermath of reporting abuse or neglect.

EDDN 513 Seminar in School Violence Prevention and Intervention

Seminar on statutes, regulations and policies relating to a safe, nonviolent school climate; effective classroom management techniques and academic supports that promote a nonviolent school climate and enhance learning; social and problem-solving skill development for students within the regular school curriculum; warning signs within a developmental and social context that relate to violence and other troubling behaviors in children; intervention techniques to address school violence situations, and how to participate in an effective school/community referral process for students exhibiting violent behavior. 

SEDN 565 3-hour Autism Workshop (required for NYSED certification)

3-hour Autism Workshop (required for NYSED certification)

EDDN 565 6-hour Bullying and Harassment Workshop (required for NYSED certification)

6-hour Bullying and Harassment Workshop (required for NYSED certification)

Non-Credit Seminars and Preparation Workshops for NYSTCE (New York State Teacher Certification Examinations)

EDDN 515 Strengthening Writing and Reading Skills

This 12-session course focuses on enhancing the writing and reading comprehension skills students need to successfully complete graduate-level coursework in degree-bearing programs in the Division of Graduate Studies. The philosophy of the course is that good writing requires good thinking; good writing requires good reading, and students will become better writers and readers through practice, practice, and more practice. With this in mind, an aim of the course is to help students refine their writing and reading at the graduate level through guided instruction, hands-on exercises, many chances to interact with course instructors and peers, and opportunities to practice a variety of approaches to writing and reading. Attention is also paid to the communication skills and strategies students can use when taking required New York State teacher certification and other professional certification tests. Course learning topics and practice exercises and assignments are sequential. The course also provides students with materials on how to research topics for coursework and how to correctly apply APA style to research papers and reflection papers. Attendance at all 12 sessions is mandatory.

This course is offered in a friendly and supportive atmosphere. Classes meet weekly for two-and-a-half hours. Course instructors provide expert writing and reading help and are experienced in helping students write and read with greater ability and confidence.

Students are required to maintain a portfolio of their writing and reading assignments and exercises. Portfolios are established authentic assessment tools used to measure students’ progress in writing skills development and critical reading and to indicate where extra help may be needed in these areas. Weekly written feedback from course instructors will be included in each student’s portfolio. Summary progress reports will be provided to the students at the midpoint and final session of the course.

Graduate-level writing should be error free. With this in mind, students will be provided with materials on standard American English grammar, usage, capitalization, punctuation and spelling.

This course is graded on a Pass/Fail basis. Students must complete all writing and reading assignments and bring their portfolios to all sessions. All assignments must be completed on time. One late assignment is permitted as long as it is completed and submitted the next scheduled session. Students who fail to comply with these requirements will be dropped from the course.

EDSN 567 edTPA Test Preparation Seminar

This test preparation course is a non-credit, non-graded course that focuses on the creation of a learning segment with at least three lesson presentations within a structure of a Planning Section, Instruction Section, and Assessment Section, along with attention given to work on expressive and receptive language skills, as required by the New York State Education Department (NYSED) for the Ed Teacher Performance Assessment (EdTPA) that is now a NYSED requirement for NYS Initial Teacher Certification.

EDDN 562 CST Students with Disabilities Workshop

CST Students with Disabilities Workshop

EDDN 580 Educating All Students Exam Prep

This non-credit, non-graded seminar helps candidates to prepare for the Educating All Students exam. The exam content focuses on effectively teaching diverse student populations, English Language Learners, and students with disabilities as well as competencies related to the parent-school connection and the professional responsibilities of effective educators. This exam is required by the New York State Education Department (NYSED) for all candidates seeking New York State Initial Teacher Certification and School Leadership certification.