Plan of Study

The following are the courses of study required for completion of the M.S. in School Counseling at Touro College. Successful completion of 20 courses (60 credits) and required seminars leads to the Master's degree.

For those students taking the bilingual extension in pupil personnel services, you will need to follow the same School Counseling curriculum for the first two years. In your third year, you will take two bilingual extension courses (EDPN 671 and EDPN 672) and instead of the second internship, SCPN 702, you will take a bilingual internship, PSGN 698. This will allow qualified students to graduate with an MS in School Counseling with a Bilingual Extension in Pupil Personnel Services (BLE PPS) for only six additional credits (two classes). Please note that of the three bilingual classes - EDPN 620 (part of the School Counseling curriculum as well), EDPN 671, EDPN 672, only one may be taken online; and MS in School Counseling students who take courses in BLE PPS will need to submit two graduation forms - one in each program, but will only pay one graduation fee.

* The Exit Examination must be taken prior to starting the internship.

Fall (Year 1)

EDSN 640 Assessment of Individual Differences in General and Special Education: A Socio-Cultural Perspective

This course focuses on assessment in general education and special education of individual differences in intelligence, learning potential, personality, motivation, and student achievement; management of data from assessment and monitoring of student progress; characteristics of standardized tests; the role of educational testing in program design and informing instruction, particularly for students with disabilities, including children with autism; assessment of young children; use of achievement tests; introduction to dynamic (or interactive) assessment; differences between static and dynamic assessment; the use of teacher-made, informal tests; and opportunity to observe and practice use of achievement tests and/or curriculum-based assessment approaches in the classroom.

EDPN 620 Child Development

This course focuses on the nature of physical, cognitive, emotional, social, and moral development from birth through adolescence, with implications for learning and teaching; major perspectives on the study of child development, including Vygotsky’s socio-cultural theory of child development and learning; periods of child development from birth through adolescence, seen in cultural context, with implications for learning and teaching; integration of theory and research findings from the fields of developmental and educational psychology; and multicultural contexts for growth, development, and learning with diverse student populations.

SCPN 600 Foundations of School Counseling

This course offers a review of the historical, philosophical, legal, and ethical underpinnings of the school counseling profession. The course explores the current and emerging role of the school counselor, from writing student assessments and dealing with school crises to setting budgets and running effective meetings. The course also addresses the transformed role of school counselor as it pertains to the American School Counselor Association's National Model for Counseling Programs.

Spring (Year 1)

SCPN 658 Legal and Ethical Issues in School Counseling

The course explores the legal and ethical issues involved in School Counseling and the research relevant to ethical behavior of counselors in mental health, career, and school settings. The course further explores the study of important legal developments related to confidentiality, testing, and supervision.

SCPN 676 School and Community Relations

This course provides an examination of the role and importance of the community in the school system. It also provides an important look at the significance of community relations within the school system and its impact on the students, teachers and administration. This course is meant as an introduction to the principles of the community collaboration in school-student-parent relations.

SCPN 636 Counseling Theory and Techniques

This course examines the dynamics and approaches of major theories in the field of counseling, as well as explores the historical perspectives and philosophies upon which they are based. Theories to be addressed include Person-Centered Therapy, Cognitive Therapy, Gestalt Therapy and Solution-Focused Therapy. The course will also focus on various experiential techniques.

Summer (Year 1)

PSGN 678 Lifestyle and Career Development

This course is designed to provide a comprehensive overview of theoretical and practice aspects of career development across the life-span. In this context, the major career development theories will be presented as well as the treatment implications for counseling and psycho-educational interventions.

SCPN 654 Topics in Educational Psychology

The course provides a detailed analysis of modern learning theories and practices as they relate to the k-12 environment. The course investigates the major research in educational psychology focusing on cognition and further explores emotional and behavioral perspectives.

Fall (Year 2)

PSGN 637 Appraisal in Child and Adolescent Counseling II

This course is a continuation of PSY 636 and examines additional disorders and their assessments.  The course focuses on utilizing rating scales and more quantifiable methodology to assess social-emotional status, and contrasts clinical and non-clinical populations. Work, school and home intervention techniques are emphasized and include topics such as functional behavioral assessment, and behavior management applications.

SCPN 641 Academic Functioning: Educational Intervention

For School Counselors, understanding teaching and learning is critical. Besides testing and counseling, School Counselors are expected to serve on pre-referral intervention teams and to consult with over-worked teachers on a variety of issues. This course provides students with tools to perform those functions. Students attain a basic understanding of how people learn, as well as the most popular theories about learning as a social and cognitive process. Focus is on recognizing where and how learning problems typically arise, tools and strategies to prevent and/or remediate such problems. While there is an assessment component, this is not a testing course. The assessment in this course is dynamic in nature and used directly in intervention planning.  Consultation issues are briefly covered.

SCPN 656 Organization and Administration of School Counseling Services

This course covers a range of issues involved in managing a school counseling program, from writing student assessments and dealing with school crises to setting budgets and running effective meetings. The course addresses the transformed role of school counselor as it pertains to the American School Counselor Association's National Model for Counseling Programs. The course further provides the necessary knowledge for developing a comprehensive school counseling program by working through the planning, designing, implementing and evaluating stages.

Spring (Year 2)

PSGN 631 Counseling Families of Exceptional Children

The focus of this course is to develop an understanding of the role and dynamics of a family in the management of exceptional children. The course introduces Family Systems theory and also explores the family as a mediator of the culture and as a context within which the child develops. The course addresses the interactions of families with children with handicapping conditions such as medical conditions and learning problems. A focus is on the impact of the child with special needs on parents and siblings. Students develop skills in assessing the family’s interactions with the referred child, and evaluation of the family’s needs. They become familiar with the impact and relevance of the socio/economic and cultural context for families with special needs children.

PSGN 680 Group Dynamics and Organizational Diagnosis (OD)

The course builds on theories introduced in the prerequisite course, Use of Self (PSGN 682), and applies these theories to diagnosing key challenges in organizations.  Students learn to use a consultative approach to affect change.  Discussion, role-play, field practice and reflection will be the primary tools for learning. Students must be prepared to find a “client” with which to conduct fieldwork.

SCPN 648 Classroom Management: Students as Change Agents

This course examines the role of the school counselor in serving children and adolescents who present behavior problems in the school and/or community. The course introduces basic behavior management techniques. The course further focuses on teaching social skills (primarily through cognitive or cognitive behavioral interventions) with an emphasis on teaching students self-regulations and strategies aimed at changing their own behavior.

SCPN 652 Advanced Issues in Vocational Counseling

This course provides a solid understanding of the process of improving high schools so that more students are able to excel in freshman-level college courses or entry-level jobs, laying a solid foundation for lifelong growth and success. The course also provides guidelines for high school faculty to adapt their programs of instruction in the direction of enhanced college/career readiness. Further explored are practical strategies for improving students' content knowledge and academic behaviors through best practices and research-based recommendations for change.

SCPN 685 Practicum

This practicum experience provides 100 hours of supervised practice in a counseling setting similar to the setting in which the student may be placed in internships. The practicum includes class meetings for group supervision and discussions and is designed to provide opportunities for students to work with diverse clients and client situations, affording students a structured and supportive environment in which to apply counseling theories, techniques and skills learned in previous course work. Focusing on the school environment (K-12), students also develop skills in observations, feedback, case preparation, interview analysis and reporting as well as become aware of a variety of professional resources and community referral agencies.

Fall (Year 3)

PSGN 670 Best Practices in Crisis Intervention

This course covers the theoretical foundations and current research on the impact of trauma and disasters on children, adolescents and adults. It focuses on best practices for short-term and crisis intervention to support a return to normalcy and resilience in youth. A major focus is on identification, intervention, and treatment of children who exhibit signs of distress or who are at-risk for future mental health problems. Group work is explored as a means to therapeutically intervene with youngsters who exhibit signs of traumatic stress.

SCPN 701 Internship I

The purpose of this practicum experience is to provide opportunities for students to work with diverse clients and client situations, affording students a structured and supportive environment in which to apply counseling theories, techniques and skills learned in previous course work. Focusing on the school environment (K-12), students also develop skills in observations, feedback, case preparation, interview analysis and reporting as well as become aware of a variety of professional resources and community referral agencies.

Spring (Year 3)

PSGN 670 Best Practices in Crisis Intervention

This course covers the theoretical foundations and current research on the impact of trauma and disasters on children, adolescents and adults. It focuses on best practices for short-term and crisis intervention to support a return to normalcy and resilience in youth. A major focus is on identification, intervention, and treatment of children who exhibit signs of distress or who are at-risk for future mental health problems. Group work is explored as a means to therapeutically intervene with youngsters who exhibit signs of traumatic stress.

SCPN 701 Internship I

The purpose of this practicum experience is to provide opportunities for students to work with diverse clients and client situations, affording students a structured and supportive environment in which to apply counseling theories, techniques and skills learned in previous course work. Focusing on the school environment (K-12), students also develop skills in observations, feedback, case preparation, interview analysis and reporting as well as become aware of a variety of professional resources and community referral agencies.